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20130119
20130119
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this is not the opportune time to have endean elaborate inauguration. it decided to move the inauguration today in front of the capital. could he do that? he did. the joint inaugural committee was not happy with that decision. the president of united states can decide above and beyond the date and time they're being sworn in. -- in, among other things. we move them from the east front to the west front. the crowd had been getting bigger and bigger. one reason to have them on the west front is because you could accommodate more people. if you look to the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was the first sworn in, the crowd went back to maybe a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, the crowd ge
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
tradition of the inauguration speech held at the capitol. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inaugurations, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little bit further
is jefferson's own work. >> franklin roosevelt had fireside chats. did he claim that he came up with that phrase? or was it the commentator that introduced in? butcher was on cbs, he was the guy who invented him. roosevelt wasn't prepared for it. robert trout was the one who introduced him for the fireside chat. but the word -- he wasn't sure at first. but again, a quick digression. but i've done some baseball writing. one of the things i found out is that when roosevelt started to write the fireside chats, he's a slightly aristocratic individual and he wants to talk to the american people. and he feels that he is coaching them out of the depression. and he starts using baseball heavily. and he said, you know, i just can't get the first base of this legislation where there is some member of the opposite party. so he would use these metaphors. it was then picked up by eisenhower. it is based on football. and that sort of becomes a big change in language. the president takes on a popular metaphor for explaining things. and it was explained in much more legislative, bureaucratic ty
hoover, franklin roosevelt, which was signed by his wife, eleanor roosevelt, harry truman, and dwight eisenhower, lyndon johnson, john kennedy, richard nixon, gerald ford, jimmy carter, ronald reagan, george bush, and so on. more recently, george w. bush and barack obama. the tradition has been maintained. when a new president is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact them and have them sign this historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it is one of those great pieces of history that has been long associated with this church, from 1856 till the present one of the little-known fact about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, and worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. people feel this is a longstanding tradition. it began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1933. when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the oath of office, in the depths of the great depression. he contacted the church and he organized a special service with his former headma
the bitter partisan divide that exists in washington in the speech? >> i was just reading franklin roosevelt's second inauguration speech and he was in the a similar situation to barack obama. the economy was struggling. and he did not give a speech that was designed to say, heal the nation's wounds and bring the nation together. he gave a surprisingly polarizing speech saying we have a ways to go. we have got a -- it's not about more for those who already have much. it's about helping those who have nothing. it was called the one-third of the nation speech, because he pointed out, look, we are not at the promised land, i see a nation that has a long way to go. do we quit now. i expect actually, look barack obama's main goal is to democratic house in two years. unless he does that, he will not legislatively anything that he wants. so, if that is -- we are going to see a test of that in this speech and we will see a test of that in the first few days of the administration. if the agenda is polarizing, then we see himming looking at 2015. >> van, do not go too far, when we come back, a rare lo
to make our government a place for what franklin roosevelt called bold, persistent experimentation, a government for our tomorrows, not our yesterdays. let us give this capital back to the people to whom it belongs. [applause] to renew america, we must meet challenges abroad as well as at home. there is no longer a clear division between what is foreign and what is domestic. the world economy, the world environment, the world aids crisis, the world arms race -- they affect us all. today, as an older order passes, the new world is more free but less stable. communism's collapse has called forth old animosities and new dangers. clearly, america must continue to lead the world we did so much to make. while america rebuilds at home, we will not shrink from the challenges nor fail to seize the opportunities of this new world. together with our friends and allies, we will work to shape change, lest it engulf us. when our vital interests are challenged or the will and conscience of the international community is defied, we will act, with peaceful diplomacy whenever possible, with force wh
massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a very unique year, 1945. in most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or if we're in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it end
country, or franklin roosevelt, we have nothing to fear but fear itself. or abraham lincoln, with malice towards none in the civil war. it's almost as much the moment, the point we are in history and a president who rises to that moment, unites americans, touches the common spirit, as it is the skill of all my friends who are speech writers coming up with those memorable words. >> arthel: if it's that idea of touching our collective soul and make the best of the moment, as you would say is the best use of an inaugural speech, what do you think the american people want to hear in president obama's second inaugural speech on monday? >> you know, if you think back four years ago, the country was full of hope. it was a real celebration. it was an historic moment. we were maturitying our first african-american president. there was a sense that they were on the verge of a great time of hope. things are definitely different now. we've got a divided country. it's a less historic moment. we got a lot of folks still looking for jobs and can't find them. we've got partisan politics and a paralyzed
was the first president to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a unique year, and most situations, even if we're in a recession or foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but
on their heels. overreach is a common risk of presidents in their second term. classic example is franklin roosevelt wins the election, tries to change the supreme court. it all comes tumbling down. the president has to be conscious of that. divide republicans between those who believe the party has to try to rebuild itself, rebuild the national majority and those that are locked into a staunchly conservative view? >> even with the supreme court's decision, would you expect that it will still play a large role in the second term? >> it's absolutely critical for him to be able to make this work. his re-election means republicans in congress will not be able to repeal it. >> and next year is when we really start to feel the impact. >> absolutely. he is still in hand-to-hand combat with governors in particular in implementing it. a number of republican governors have refused to set up what's required, and the public component of expansion of coverage. there's lots of challenges of moving 30 million more people into an insurance-based system. so that could mean enormous implementation challeng
to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. the story by douglas brinkley. >> that was an unusual year in 1945. most situations, even in a recession or we're in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i will be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like
since franklin d. roosevelt to take the oath of office four times. in 2009, he took the oath twice because, in a do-over, performed the day after chief justice john roberts tripped on his lines during the first inauguration. >> within a few days, the president will be walking from that part of the capitol right here, and then down these airs. >> suarez: new york democratic senator chuck schumer is chairman of the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies, which oversees all of the inaugural rituals related to the capitol. >> there's no tanks in the streets, there's no rioting or picketing or protesting. it's a beautiful thing about america that the inauguration reminds us of. with all the trouble we have, the inauguration symbolizes that the republic marches onward. >> suarez: the president's inauguration will begin, as it did four years ago, with a national day of service tomorrow where people wille encouraged to pledge a year's effort to community organizations. at the inauguration itself, there are a few firsts. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation was si
her husband franklin delano roosevelt was president, eleanor roosevelt was the first, first lady to hold her own press conference and these press conferences came with a catch, for women reporters only. women were typically barred from the presidential press conferences, and so mrs. roosevelt only allowed women to attend hers. nearly 70 years after fdr, and we see a lot of women covering the white house, but among the five major networks, four still employ men as the chief white house correspondent. so folks who sit on the front row in the white house briefing room are still mostly fellows including our own chuck todd. and jessica yellin and brianna keel er are from cnn and joining them on the front row is julia pace. i want to come back to the white house to talk about this question, because if women in the room matter and we are all critiquing the president's picture, the fact is that the room is full of a lot of guys, too. >> we were on the campaign trail together, nia, and i and there were a lot of women in the campaign bus, and it was not boys on the bus anymore. this is a t
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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